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Provision Newsletter

Paying for health care in retirement

Posted On:Mar 20th, 2019     Posted In:Provision Newsletter Articles    Posted By:Provision Wealth

In retirement, an Australian couple needs from $4,700 to $9,400 a year to pay for health care , according to the Association of Superannuation Funds of Australia, and the average cost of private health insurance rose 4.8 per cent in 2017, far outpacing inflation.

This high and ever-increasing cost of health care, combined with longer life spans, has elevated the need to plan

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In retirement, an Australian couple needs from $4,700 to $9,400 a year to pay for health care , according to the Association of Superannuation Funds of Australia, and the average cost of private health insurance rose 4.8 per cent in 2017, far outpacing inflation.

This high and ever-increasing cost of health care, combined with longer life spans, has elevated the need to plan for paying for doctor visits, prescriptions and other medical costs in retirement.

Vanguard’s Roadmap to Financial Security identifies health risk as one of five risks that you need to understand and evaluate when you plan for retirement. The others are:

  • Market risk

  • Longevity and mortality risk

  • Event risk, the risk that large and unexpected expenses, such as property damage, will punch a hole in retirement funds

  • Tax and policy risk, the risk that a change in a government rule or policy will affect your financial plans

Vanguard defines health risk as both the risk of needing care because of deteriorating health and the risk of not being able to afford it because of a lack of insurance coverage, government benefits, or financial resources.

Accounting for health risk is complicated because it encompasses so many uncertainties. Retirement may be many years in the future, outlays vary wildly depending on the length and type of care, and few people can predict how aging will affect their health.

In addition, health risk is intertwined with other risks. Women, for example, face greater longevity risk, but that makes them more likely to require more expensive care in later years. Australia’s aging population may put pressure on government budgets, potentially changing health-care and other funding.

If you are approaching or in retirement, start by calculating your risk in three areas:

  • Overall health. Assessing your current health is a good starting point. If you have good health, you may not need to worry as much about higher costs in retirement. But if you have a chronic illness or know you will have to take a certain medication for the rest of your life, tally up your out-of-pocket expenditures to estimate potential retirement costs. You should also take lifestyle and genetics into account.

  • Available coverage Establishing the level of coverage provided by Medicare and other sources can help clarify which types and what portion of expenses will have to be paid from other assets or private insurance.

  • Level of desired care. Consider what kind of care you want and determine how to pay for it. You may choose private insurance, for example, if it offers access to preferred doctors. The level of care you desire can increase or decrease total health-care costs and the amount of assets needed to pay for them. After you take these the factors into account, you can better estimate overall health risk and decide how to cover it. You can then match resources such as personal assets in a contingency reserve, public coverage, insurance, or any combination of the three to your needs. 

 Please call us on |PHONE| if you would like to discuss.

 

Source : Vanguard

Written by Robin Bowerman, Head of Corporate Affairs at Vanguard.

Reproduced with permission of Vanguard Investments Australia Ltd.

Vanguard Investments Australia Ltd (ABN 72 072 881 086 / AFS Licence 227263) is the product issuer. We have not taken yours and your clients’ circumstances into account when preparing this material so it may not be applicable to the particular situation you are considering. You should consider your circumstances and our Product Disclosure Statement (PDS) or Prospectus before making any investment decision. You can access our PDS or Prospectus online or by calling us. This material was prepared in good faith and we accept no liability for any errors or omissions. Past performance is not an indication of future performance.


© 2019 Vanguard Investments Australia Ltd. All rights reserved. 

Important:
Any information provided by the author detailed above is separate and external to our business and our Licensee. Neither our business, nor our Licensee take any responsibility for any action or any service provided by the author.

Any links have been provided with permission for information purposes only and will take you to external websites, which are not connected to our company in any way. Note: Our company does not endorse and is not responsible for the accuracy of the contents/information contained within the linked site(s) accessible from this page.

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The rewards of dividends

Posted On:Mar 20th, 2019     Posted In:Provision Newsletter Articles    Posted By:Provision Wealth

When share market volatility rises, more investors would make the mistake of concentrating too much on short-term movements in share prices.

Yet investors should never overlook that share-market returns are from both capital growth and dividends. Historically, dividends have made up a large proportion of the total returns from Australian shares.

Post-GFC dividend rewards

An illustration of how much dividends can contribute to total share

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When share market volatility rises, more investors would make the mistake of concentrating too much on short-term movements in share prices.

Yet investors should never overlook that share-market returns are from both capital growth and dividends. Historically, dividends have made up a large proportion of the total returns from Australian shares.

Post-GFC dividend rewards

An illustration of how much dividends can contribute to total share returns is the performance of the Australian share market since the global financial crisis (GFC).

Once reinvested dividends are taken into account, the performance of the Australian share market following the GFC looks much stronger – even before allowing for franking credits on dividends:

  • The S&P/ASX 200 index (prices only) closed on March 13 this year almost 10 per cent below its pre-GFC closing high (reached in November 2007) yet 96 per cent above its GFC closing low.

  • By contrast, the S&P/ASX 200 total-return index (share prices plus reinvested dividends) closed on March 13 this year 50 per cent higher than its pre-GFC high.Critically, this total-return index is 205 per cent above its GFC low.

Grossed-up dividends

Franking credits – tax credits for corporate tax already paid by companies – make a valuable contribution to returns from Australian shares that investors may sometimes overlook. A fully-franked dividend of, say, 4 per cent grosses up for franking credits to 5.71 per cent.

Compounding dividends

The disciplined reinvestment of dividends – if possible, given an investor’s financial circumstances – magnifies their rewards. As Smart Investor regularly discusses, compounding occurs as returns are earned on past returns as well as your original investment.

Dividends as a volatility cushion

Your dividends can act as a volatility cushion. This is because dividends keep flowing from a diversified share portfolio as share prices fluctuate.

Dividends and your long-term focus

A way to help block out the distraction of daily movements in share prices is to remind yourself about the two sides to share-market returns, dividends and capital gains. This should assist you to remain focused on your long-term goals.

Dividend-chasing trap

While recognising the contribution that dividends make to an investor’s share-market returns, don’t fall into the trap of abandoning a carefully-constructed, well-diversified share portfolio in the pursuit of higher dividends. Being a dividend-chaser often involves investing in higher-risk, more-concentrated share portfolios.

Total-return investing

Finally, think about taking a total-return approach to investing for your overall investment portfolio. Total-return investing focuses on both the income and capital growth generated by an overall portfolio.

This approach should help maintain a portfolio’s diversification, allow more control over the size and timing of eventual portfolio withdrawals upon retirement, and increase a portfolio’s longevity.

Please contact us on |PHONE| if you seek further discussion on this topic

 

Source : Vanguard 

Written by Robin Bowerman, Head of Corporate Affairs at Vanguard. 

Reproduced with permission of Vanguard Investments Australia Ltd.

Vanguard Investments Australia Ltd (ABN 72 072 881 086 / AFS Licence 227263) is the product issuer. We have not taken yours and your clients’ circumstances into account when preparing this material so it may not be applicable to the particular situation you are considering. You should consider your circumstances and our Product Disclosure Statement (PDS) or Prospectus before making any investment decision. You can access our PDS or Prospectus online or by calling us. This material was prepared in good faith and we accept no liability for any errors or omissions. Past performance is not an indication of future performance.

© 2019 Vanguard Investments Australia Ltd. All rights reserved. 

Important:
Any information provided by the author detailed above is separate and external to our business and our Licensee. Neither our business, nor our Licensee take any responsibility for any action or any service provided by the author.

Any links have been provided with permission for information purposes only and will take you to external websites, which are not connected to our company in any way. Note: Our company does not endorse and is not responsible for the accuracy of the contents/information contained within the linked site(s) accessible from this page.

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How good financial advice can lead to good investor behaviour

Posted On:Mar 20th, 2019     Posted In:Provision Newsletter Articles    Posted By:Provision Wealth

Whenever market volatility rises, the benefits of treating a good financial adviser as an investor’s behavioural coach are truly highlighted.

Higher share-market volatility – whether prices are rising or falling – can tempt an investor to make emotionally-driven investment decisions that are often damaging to their portfolios.

Fortunately, a good financial adviser acting as an investor’s behavioural coach or guide can help

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Whenever market volatility rises, the benefits of treating a good financial adviser as an investor’s behavioural coach are truly highlighted.

Higher share-market volatility – whether prices are rising or falling – can tempt an investor to make emotionally-driven investment decisions that are often damaging to their portfolios.

Fortunately, a good financial adviser acting as an investor’s behavioural coach or guide can help keep potentially wealth-destructive traits in check.

A recently-published research paper, The Vanguard adviser’s alpha guide to proactive behavioural coaching, revisits the contributions that a good adviser can make as an investor’s behavioural coach – a long-favoured topic of Smart Investing.

As the paper’s author, senior investment analyst Donald Bennyhoff, writes: “Investing is an emotionally-charged effort that challenges people to contend with uncertainty and doubt”.

Behavioural coaching from an investment perspective has been defined as encouraging investors to change elements of their behaviour that would otherwise prevent them from achieving their goals.

As behavioural coaches, good advisers may warn investors about such damaging behavioural traits as over-confidence, inertia (getting in the way of saving), panicking when markets are falling, becoming greedy when markets are rising, and dwelling excessively on past losses.

A good adviser acting as a behavioural coach can:

  • Reinforce how a financial plan modifies an investor’s behaviour: Bennyhoff describes a written financial plan as “the foundation of behavioural coaching” for investors. It should take into account investors’ short and long-term goals, their tolerance to risk, and such other factors as their tax positions. More generally, Bennyhoff emphasises that a written plan helps ensure that investors “understand that investing requires them to intentionally bear risk while seeking rewards”. It provides a backbone for investment decisions and, in turn, discourages emotional decisions.

  • Remind investors to keep up their wealth-creating habits: This includes reminding investors to regularly rebalance their portfolios back to their strategic or target allocations. And advisers can keep reminding investors about the rewards of such investment fundamentals as long-term compounding (as returns are earned on past returns as well as invested capital), trying to save more, minimising investment costs and personal budgeting. These reminders are particularly valuable during times of higher market volatility and uncertainty.

Think about whether you can take more advantage of an adviser’s skills in ways that have nothing to do with trying to beat the markets – including acting as a behavioural coach and a personal wealth manager.

Please contact us pn |PHONE| if we can be of assistance .

Source : Vanguard 

Written by Robin Bowerman, Head of Corporate Affairs at Vanguard.

Reproduced with permission of Vanguard Investments Australia Ltd

Vanguard Investments Australia Ltd (ABN 72 072 881 086 / AFS Licence 227263) is the product issuer. We have not taken yours and your clients’ circumstances into account when preparing this material so it may not be applicable to the particular situation you are considering. You should consider your circumstances and our Product Disclosure Statement (PDS) or Prospectus before making any investment decision. You can access our PDS or Prospectus online or by calling us. This material was prepared in good faith and we accept no liability for any errors or omissions. Past performance is not an indication of future performance.

© 2019 Vanguard Investments Australia Ltd. All rights reserved.

Important:
Any information provided by the author detailed above is separate and external to our business and our Licensee. Neither our business, nor our Licensee take any responsibility for any action or any service provided by the author.

Any links have been provided with permission for information purposes only and will take you to external websites, which are not connected to our company in any way. Note: Our company does not endorse and is not responsible for the accuracy of the contents/information contained within the linked site(s) accessible from this page.

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Employer not paying your super? How to find out & what you can do

Posted On:Feb 25th, 2019     Posted In:Provision Newsletter Articles    Posted By:Provision Wealth

Billions of dollars in super contributions go unpaid every year, so if you’ve never checked your super account before, now might be a good time.

Recently a girlfriend posted on social media that she was owed over $10,000 in super from a former boss, who had since shut up shop (money she may never see when she does eventually retire).

Responses from

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Billions of dollars in super contributions go unpaid every year, so if you’ve never checked your super account before, now might be a good time.

Recently a girlfriend posted on social media that she was owed over $10,000 in super from a former boss, who had since shut up shop (money she may never see when she does eventually retire).

Responses from her circle of mates revealed she wasn’t alone, with one person commenting that, like her, they still hadn’t received their unpaid super money, with situations where an employer goes out of business sometimes harder to chase up.

Good news – the last analysis by the Australian Taxation Office (ATO) revealed about 95% of super contributions were being paid by employers. The bad news – that left $2.79 billion in unpaid super1!

If you want to make sure you’re getting paid what you’re owed, here’s what you need to know and what you can do if something doesn’t look right (keeping in mind, the sooner you act, the better).

Who’s most at risk?

The ATO previously indicated that about 50% of super debts it deals with relate to insolvency (in other words, companies that don’t have the cash to meet their obligations)2.

On top of that, data from the Australian Securities and Investments Commission indicated non-payment of super was more likely to happen in certain industries (hospitality, construction and retail to name a few)3.

What your employer should be paying you

If you’re earning over $450 (before tax) a month, no less than 9.5% of your before-tax salary should generally be going into your super under the Superannuation Guarantee scheme.

If you’d like help crunching the numbers, give the ATO’s Estimate my super tool a go. It can provide you with an estimate of how much super your employer should have paid into your super account.

How can I check if I’m getting paid the super I’m owed?

  1. Start by looking at your payslips and know that while super contributions may be listed on your payslip, this doesn’t always mean money has been deposited into your super account.

  2. With that in mind, also check your super statements, call your super fund or log into your online account to see exactly what has been paid into your super. Note, super contributions are paid quarterly (at a minimum) even if your wages are paid weekly, fortnightly or monthly, which means super contributions paid by your employer might only be deposited into your account four times a year.

What should I do if something doesn’t look right?

  1. If it looks like you haven’t been paid what you should’ve, speak to the person who handles the payroll at your work, as there may be a simple explanation.

  2. If you’re not satisfied with what they tell you, you can lodge an unpaid super enquiry with the ATO. You’ll need to give your personal details, including your tax file number, the period relating to your enquiry and your employer’s details. You can also call the ATO on 13 10 20.

  3. It’s worth contacting your super fund too, as your employer may have a contractual arrangement with your super fund, which means your super fund may be able to follow up any unpaid super on your behalf.

Please contact us on |PHONE|if you seek further assistance.

Australian Taxation Office (ATO) – Superannuation guarantee gap (figures related to 2015-16)
2, 3 The Association of Superannuation Funds of Australia (ASFA) media release – Unpaid super – workers deserve better

Source: AMP February 2019 

This information is provided by AMP Life Limited. It is general information only and hasn’t taken your circumstances into account. It’s important to consider your particular circumstances and the relevant Product Disclosure Statement or Terms and Conditions,  before deciding what’s right for you. Read our Financial Services Guide for information about our services, including the fees and other benefits that AMP companies and their representatives may receive in relation to products and services provided to you.

All information on this website is subject to change without notice. Although the information is from sources considered reliable, AMP does not guarantee that it is accurate or complete. You should not rely upon it and should seek professional advice before making any financial decision. Except where liability under any statute cannot be excluded, AMP does not accept any liability for any resulting loss or damage of the reader or any other person.

 Important:
This provides general information and hasn’t taken your circumstances into account. It’s important to consider your particular circumstances before deciding what’s right for you. Although the information is from sources considered reliable, we do not guarantee that it is accurate or complete. You should not rely upon it and should seek qualified advice before making any investment decision. Except where liability under any statute cannot be excluded, we do not accept any liability (whether under contract, tort or otherwise) for any resulting loss or damage of the reader or any other person. 

Any information provided by the author detailed above is separate and external to our business and our Licensee. Neither our business, nor our Licensee take any responsibility for any action or any service provided by the author.

Any links have been provided with permission for information purposes only and will take you to external websites, which are not connected to our company in any way. Note: Our company does not endorse and is not responsible for the accuracy of the contents/information contained within the linked site(s) accessible from this page

 

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What financial records you need to keep and how to organise them

Posted On:Feb 25th, 2019     Posted In:Provision Newsletter Articles    Posted By:Provision Wealth

A quick guide to organising your financial paperwork

With Marie Kondo’s books and TV shows riding high in the charts, it feels as though everyone’s talking about the joys of decluttering and tidying up.

But when you’re drowning in a sea of old bank statements, utility bills and receipts, it can be difficult to know where to make a start.

The good news

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A quick guide to organising your financial paperwork

With Marie Kondo’s books and TV shows riding high in the charts, it feels as though everyone’s talking about the joys of decluttering and tidying up.

But when you’re drowning in a sea of old bank statements, utility bills and receipts, it can be difficult to know where to make a start.

The good news is that you don’t have to be a global lifestyle guru to make a positive change. Even making some simple changes can put you on track to taming your paperwork and:

  • make it easier to find what you need at tax time

  • help your loved ones find documents easily if something happens

  • find important documents in an emergency.

What financial records and paperwork do you need to keep?

This is the fun bit…it’s time to start throwing stuff away.

So be ruthless. But there are some bits of paper that you should hang on to. 

Anything you need for your tax return…

  • Payments you’ve received such as wages, interest, dividends and rental income

  • Expenses related to income such as work-related outgoings or rental repairs

  • Sale or purchase of assets such as property or shares

  • Donations, contributions or gifts to charities

  • Private health insurance

  • Medical expenses, both your own and those of any dependants.

You need to keep these documents for five years after you lodge your tax return in case you’re asked to substantiate your claims. And it’s a good idea to keep your Notice of Tax Assessments for five years as well.

…anything related to property you own…

  • Property deeds

  • Mortgage papers

  • Renovation approvals

  • Warranties relating to work undertaken. 

…and some other important bits of paper

  • Wills

  • Tax file numbers

  • Powers of attorney

  • Birth certificates

  • Death certificates

  • Marriage certificates

  • Immunisation records

  • Passports

  • Current insurance policies

  • Current superannuation documents

  • Loan documents

  • Vehicle registration

  • Vehicle service history

  • Business registrations

  • Qualifications.

What financial records and paperwork can you throw away?

There are some documents you can toss. As a rule, once a document has been replaced by a newer version, it’s safe to dispose of the older copy. And let’s face it, do you really need that electricity bill from your old house back in 2014?

There’s also no need to hang on to credit card receipts once you’ve reconciled them against your bank statements, unless they’re needed for warranties.

You should probably keep hold of credit card and bank statements for a year but you can throw away other household paperwork like utility bills.

Four quick steps to organising your paperwork

Congratulations! You’ve finally taken a wrecking ball to the mountain of paperwork, the shredder bin is full and you’re feeling pretty good.

But you’re only halfway there. You need to put a system in place to avoid creating yet another mountain.

1. Protect yourself

Financial documents can contain sensitive personal information so it’s not a good idea to simply throw them in the bin. Buying a shredder or using a document disposal company should keep your details safe against identity theft.

2. Go digital

Many companies are moving towards electronic statements to help you reduce your paperwork and give the environment a boost at the same time! You can also make electronic versions of your old documents with a scanning app such as CamScanner, Genius Scan or Scannable.

3. Think files and folders

Whether you choose to keep paper or electronic copies, it’s a good idea to have a filing system with physical or electronic folders and labels to remind you how long to keep them for. Record-keeping apps like Evernote or Sign-N-Send can help.

4. Back it up

Think about storing important documents in a fireproof safe or offsite in a safety deposit box. For extra security, you can back up online files on an external hard drive or a cloud-based solution.

While you’re at it…

Organising your paperwork also presents the ideal opportunity to review your financial commitments.

So why not take a look at your budget, check you have enough insurance cover and shop around for a better deal on your utilities?

Please contact us on |PHONE| we can help you find ways to get on top of your finances.

Source : AMP February 2019 

This information is provided by AMP Life Limited. It is general information only and hasn’t taken your circumstances into account. It’s important to consider your particular circumstances and the relevant Product Disclosure Statement or Terms and Conditions. Read our Financial Services Guide for information about our services, including the fees and other benefits that AMP companies and their representatives may receive in relation to products and services provided to you.

All information on this website is subject to change without notice. Although the information is from sources considered reliable, AMP does not guarantee that it is accurate or complete. You should not rely upon it and should seek professional advice before making any financial decision. Except where liability under any statute cannot be excluded, AMP does not accept any liability for any resulting loss or damage of the reader or any other person.

Important:
This provides general information and hasn’t taken your circumstances into account. It’s important to consider your particular circumstances before deciding what’s right for you. Although the information is from sources considered reliable, we do not guarantee that it is accurate or complete. You should not rely upon it and should seek qualified advice before making any investment decision. Except where liability under any statute cannot be excluded, we do not accept any liability (whether under contract, tort or otherwise) for any resulting loss or damage of the reader or any other person. 

Any information provided by the author detailed above is separate and external to our business and our Licensee. Neither our business, nor our Licensee take any responsibility for any action or any service provided by the author.

Any links have been provided with permission for information purposes only and will take you to external websites, which are not connected to our company in any way. Note: Our company does not endorse and is not responsible for the accuracy of the contents/information contained within the linked site(s) accessible from this page

 

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Getting married – starting on the right foot

Posted On:Feb 22nd, 2019     Posted In:Provision Newsletter Articles    Posted By:Provision Wealth

Getting married is an exciting time but, with so many things to think about, it can be easy to put off thinking about how you will manage your money together after your wedding day.  Taking time before you say “I do” to agree on how you will deal with your finances as a married couple will pay off in the

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Getting married is an exciting time but, with so many things to think about, it can be easy to put off thinking about how you will manage your money together after your wedding day.  Taking time before you say “I do” to agree on how you will deal with your finances as a married couple will pay off in the long run.

Plan your wedding

Weddings can be very expensive. Our wedding infographic shows the average Australian wedding costs over $36,000. But there are lots of ways to keeps the costs of your wedding down without spoiling the magic of the day.

Follow these steps to keep the wedding costs under control:

  • Work out how much money you need – decide how much you want to spend on each item – including food and drinks, venue, cake, cars and music – and come up with a total cost.

  • Start saving for your wedding now – open a savings account or a term deposit to earn a high interest rate on your savings. Use the savings goals calculator to work out how much you’ll need to save each week.

  • Look for ways to cut costs – research online or ask around and find out how other people have saved money on their weddings.

  • Avoid using your credit card wherever possible – try to pay for big items, like the wedding dress or reception venue, in instalments so you aren’t left with huge debts that can take years to pay off.

    Organise your finances

Relationships can run into trouble if people have different saving and spending habits, so it’s important to decide whether you want to share a joint account, keep separate accounts, or have both.

Having a joint account can make it easier to pay shared bills, but there are risks with pooling all of your money into one account.

Smart tip

Work out who is going to pay which bills. Being clear about this means you won’t incur late fees or accidentally pay the same bill twice.

Some couples prefer to keep their own separate bank accounts and transfer a set amount each payday into a joint account to cover shared bills. This can be a good option if you have very different incomes or if you just want your own spending money.

Some people simply keep their own separate bank accounts and work out who is responsible for each type of payment, rather than setting up a joint account. Every couple is different, so talk to each other about which system will work best for you.

See our page on joint bank accounts for more information.

 

Discuss your financial goals

People sometimes don’t realise that their partner has completely different financial goals. For example, one person may think paying off the mortgage as soon as possible is the most important goal, while the other wants to save money for an overseas holiday.

The best thing to do is sit down and work out the goals you want to save for together. Whatever your plans are for the future, talk about them with your partner so you are both clear on what you want and when. Then you can work together to achieve your goals.

Organise your will, insurance and superannuation

Now that you’re officially a family, anything that happens to you will directly affect your partner. So it is important to update your will, insurance policies and superannuation to reflect your new married status.

The single best thing you can do to keep your finances on track as a couple is to keep talking to each other. By having regular conversations about your bills and your savings, you will both know whether you’re on track to achieve your goals, or if you need to adjust your plans.

Please contact us on |PHONE| if you seek further assistance on this topic .

Source : ASIC’s Moneysmart February 2019 

Reproduced with the permission of ASIC’s MoneySmart Team. This article was originally published at https://www.moneysmart.gov.au/life-events-and-you/life-events/getting-married
Important note: This provides general information and hasn’t taken your circumstances into account.  It’s important to consider your particular circumstances before deciding what’s right for you. Although the information is from sources considered reliable, we do not guarantee that it is accurate or complete. You should not rely upon it and should seek qualified advice before making any investment decision. Except where liability under any statute cannot be excluded, we do not accept any liability (whether under contract, tort or otherwise) for any resulting loss or damage of the reader or any other person.  Past performance is not a reliable guide to future returns.

Important
Any information provided by the author detailed above is separate and external to our business and our Licensee. Neither our business, nor our Licensee take any responsibility for any action or any service provided by the author.

Any links have been provided with permission for information purposes only and will take you to external websites, which are not connected to our company in any way. Note: Our company does not endorse and is not responsible for the accuracy of the contents/information contained within the linked site(s) accessible from this page.

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